Dramatized Audio Bible Book Deuterocanonical Apocrypha

Dramatized Audio Bible Book Deuterocanonical Apocrypha in MP3 Form! Take a Listen!

There is no difference between the terms Deuterocanonical Canon and Old Testament Apocrypha. These terms both refer to the books mentioned below. The only difference is which term is being used by Christian denominations. Some of the Deuterocanonical or Apocrypha were written in the time between the Old and New Testaments. The books of the Apocrypha include 1 Esdras, 2 Esdras, Tobit, Judith, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, the Letter of Jeremiah, Prayer of Manasseh, 1 Maccabees, and 2 Maccabees, as well as additions to the books of Esther and Daniel amongst others included here.

1 Esdras, also First Esdras, Greek Esdras, Greek Ezra, or 3 Esdras, is an ancient Greek version of the biblical Book of Ezra in use among the early church, and many modern Christians with varying degrees of canonicity.

2 Esdras is the name of an apocalyptic book in many English versions of the Bible. Its authorship is ascribed to Ezra, a scribe and priest of the 5th century BC.

The Book of Tobit is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox biblical canons. It was recognized as canonical by the Council of Hippo, the Councils of Carthage of 397 and 417, and the Council of Florence, and confirmed in the Counter-Reformation by the Council of Trent. The book of Tobit tells the story of Tobit and his family, who are living as exiles from Israel after the Assyrian conquest. Through a series of events, Tobit goes blind and sends his son on a journey accompanied by the angel Raphael disguised as a human.

The Book of Judith is a deuterocanonical book, included in the Septuagint and the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian Old Testament of the Bible, but excluded from the Hebrew canon and assigned by Protestants to the Apocrypha. The purpose of the book is to inspire courage and patriotism through its heroine, a widow named Judith.

The Book of Esther Additions. These additions include an opening prologue that describes a dream had by Mordecai. the contents of the decree against the Jews. prayers for God’s intervention offered by Mordecai and by Esther.

The Wisdom of Solomon or Book of Wisdom is a Jewish work, written in Greek, and most likely composed in Alexandria, Egypt. Generally dated to the mid-first century BC, the central theme of the work is “Wisdom” itself, appearing under two principal aspects. There are seven of these books, namely the books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Songs (Song of Solomon), the Book of Wisdom and Sirach (Ecclesiasticus). Not all the Psalms are usually regarded as belonging to the Wisdom tradition.

Book of Wisdom Part 1

Book of Wisdom Part 2

Susanna, also called Susanna and the Elders (as chapter 13) is a narrative included in the Book of Daniel by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. It is one of the additions to Daniel, considered apocryphal by Protestants.

The narrative of Bel and the Dragon is incorporated as chapter 14 of the extended Book of Daniel. The original Septuagint text in Greek survives in a single manuscript. Bel (/ˈbeɪl/; from Akkadian bēlu), signifying “lord” or “master”, is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in the Mesopotamian religion of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. The feminine form is Belit ‘Lady, Mistress’. Bel is represented in Greek as Belos and in Latin as Belus. Yet the king noticed that Daniel did not worship the Babylonian god, Bel, which is a shortened form of Baal or Bel-Marduk. The Babylonians also worshipped a large dragon (or snake). The narrative of Bel (14:1–22) ridicules the worship of idols. They, their wives and children are put to death, and Daniel is permitted to destroy the idol of Bel and the temple.

The Prayer of Azariah and the Song of the Three Holy Children is a lengthy passage that appears after Daniel 3:23 in some translations of the Bible, including the ancient Greek Septuagint translation.

The Letter of Jeremiah, also known as the Epistle of Jeremiah, is a deuterocanonical book of the Old Testament; this letter purports to have been written by Jeremiah to the Jews who were about to be carried away as captives to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. It is also included in Orthodox Bibles as a separate book.

The Book of Baruch (also called 1 Baruch) is a book of the Apocrypha or Deuterocanonical Books that are accepted as Scripture. According to Josephus, Baruch was a Jewish aristocrat, a son of Neriah and brother of Seraiah ben Neriah, chamberlain of King Zedekiah of Judah. Baruch became the scribe of the prophet Jeremiah and wrote down the first and second editions of his prophecies as they were dictated to him.

The Book of Baruch Part 1

The Book of Baruch Part 2

Fourth Baruch is a pseudepigraphical text of the Old Testament. Paralipomena of Jeremiah appears as the title in several Ancient Greek manuscripts of the work, meaning “things left out of (the Book of) Jeremiah.” It is part of the Ethiopian Orthodox Bible.

Sirach, Ecclesiasticus, Ben Sira, Wisdom of Jesus Son of Sirach. The Book of the All-Virtuous Wisdom of Yeshua ben Sira commonly called the Wisdom of Sirach or simply Sirach (/ˈsaɪræk/), and also known as the Book of Ecclesiasticus (/ɪˌkliːziˈæstɪkəs/; abbreviated Ecclus.) or Ben Sira, is a work of ethical teachings, from approximately 200 to 175 BC, written by the Jewish scribe Yeshua ben Sira.

The Prayer of Manasseh is a short work of 15 verses recording a penitential prayer attributed to King Manasseh of Judah. The majority of scholars believe that the Prayer of Manasseh was written, in Greek, in the first or second century BC.

1 Maccabees is a book written in Hebrew by a Jewish author after the restoration of an independent Jewish kingdom by the Hasmonean dynasty, about the latter part of the 2nd century BC. The original Hebrew is lost and the most important surviving version is the Greek translation contained in the Septuagint. The name Maccabee was a title of honor given to Judas, a son of Mattathias and the hero of the Jewish wars of independence, 168–164 BC. Later, the name the Maccabees was extended to include his whole family, specifically Mattathias (his father) and Judas’ four brothers—John, Simon, Eleazar, and Jonathan. The work’s main religious theme is that the martyr’s sufferings vicariously expiated the sins of the entire Jewish people. The Maccabee’s books were preserved only by the Christian church. Augustine wrote in The City of God that they were preserved for their accounts of the martyrs.

2 Maccabees is a deuterocanonical book that focuses on the Maccabean Revolt against Antiochus IV Epiphanes and concludes with the defeat of the Seleucid empire general Nicanor in 161 BC by Judas Maccabeus, the hero of the hard work.

The Book of Enoch is an ancient Hebrew apocalyptic religious text, ascribed by tradition to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. Enoch, the seventh patriarch in the book of Genesis, was the subject of abundant apocryphal literature, especially during the Hellenistic period of Judaism (3rd-century bc to 3rd-century ad). At first revered only for his piety, he was later believed to be the recipient of secret knowledge from God. The text of the Book of Genesis says Enoch lived 365 years before he was taken by God. The text reads that Enoch “walked with God: and he was no more; for God took him” (Gen 5:21–24), which some Christians interpret as Enoch’s entering Heaven alive. It is asserted in the book itself that its author was Enoch, before the Biblical Flood. The most complete Book of Enoch comes from Ethiopic manuscripts, maṣḥafa hēnok, written in Ge’ez; which was brought to Europe by James Bruce in the late 18th century and was translated into English in the 19th century.

The Second Book of Enoch is a pseudepigraphic text in the apocalyptic genre. It describes the ascent of the patriarch Enoch, ancestor of Noah, through ten heavens in an Earth-centered cosmos. The cosmology of 2 Enoch corresponds closely with early medieval beliefs about the metaphysical structure of the universe. The Second Book of Enoch (abbreviated as 2 Enoch and also known as Slavonic Enoch, Old Bulgarian Enoch or Secrets of Enoch) is a pseudepigraphic text in the apocalyptic genre. It describes the ascent of the patriarch Enoch, ancestor of Noah, through ten heavens in an Earth-centered cosmos. Enoch is the subject of many Jewish and Christian traditions.

The Book of Jasher, which means the Book of the Upright or the Book of the Just Man is an apocryphal book mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. The translation “Book of the Just Man” is the traditional Greek and Latin translation, while the transliterated form “Jasher” is found in the King James Bible, 1611. The deuterocanonical literature and the Book of Jasher are generally thought to make up the traditional Biblical Apocrypha. The Hebrew title can be translated as “Book of the Upright.” It is, however, commonly known as “The Book of Jasher”; named after the Book of Jasher mentioned in Joshua and 2 Samuel

The Book of Jubilees, Lesser Genesis, or the Book of Division. It is sometimes called Lesser Genesis, which is an ancient Jewish religious work of 50 chapters, considered canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church as well as Beta Israel, where it is known as the Book of Division. The Jubilee (Hebrew: יובל yōḇel; Yiddish: yoyvl) is the year at the end of seven cycles of shmita (Sabbatical years) and, according to Biblical regulations, had a special impact on the ownership and management of land in the Land of Israel.

The full title of the Didache is the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles. Scholars believe it was written anonymously in the late first or early second century AD. It offers the Christian community a pastoral manual of teachings and practices, including instructions on the Eucharist and the form of the Eucharistic Prayers. The Didache is considered part of the group of second-generation Christian writings known as the Apostolic Fathers. The work was considered by some Church Fathers to be a part of the New Testament while being rejected by others as spurious or non-canonical, In the end, it was not accepted into the New Testament canon. The Didache not only promotes specific church practices but also cultivates the personal practices of the church member. As such, holiness, morality and high ethical standards are important

The Gospel of Bartholomew. Bartholomew lived in the first century AD and was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ. He was introduced to Jesus Christ through Saint Philip and is also known as “Nathaniel of Cana in Galilee,” notably in John’s Gospel. The Gospel of Bartholomew is a missing text amongst the New Testament Apocrypha, mentioned in several early sources. It may be identical to the Questions of Bartholomew.

Gospel of Thomas The Gospel of Thomas (also known as the Coptic Gospel of Thomas) is a non-canonical sayings gospel. It was discovered near Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in December 1945 among a group of books known as the Nag Hammadi library. It is not really a “Gospel” as Christians commonly understand the term, rather it is a collection of 114 sayings which are attributed to Jesus.

Book of Revelation, Revelation of John, Apocalypse of John. The Book of Revelation, often called the Book of Revelations, Revelation to John, Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation, the Revelation from Jesus Christ (from its opening words) or the Apocalypse.

 

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