Dramatized Audio Bible Book Old Testament

Listen to the Word of God and read the Bible. Know the truth and obey Jesus’ commandments. House of the Nazarene helps you engage with the Bible by hearing it and remembering it later. Read and Remember. Audio Bibles allow you to listen to the word of God in your favorite format such as MP3 included here for you!

Audio Bibles are usually about 75 hours long, so you can listen to it in just over 12 minutes a day. It takes only 52 hours and 20 minutes to read the Old Testament, and just 18 hours and 20 minutes to read the New Testament. But the point is not merely to read the whole thing to say you’ve done it or to check it off a list. The Bible itself never commands that we read the Bible through in a year. One could read the Bible in a year by reading less than 12 minutes a day!

The Old Testament contains 39 (Protestant), 46 (Catholic), or more (Orthodox and other) books, divided, very broadly, into the Pentateuch (Torah), the historical books, the “wisdom” books, and the prophets.

The genre of Genesis is a Narrative History, and Genealogies. It was written by Moses about 1450-1410 BC. Key personalities include Adam, Eve, Noah, Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, and Joseph. This book was written to record God’s creation of the world and to demonstrate His love for all that He created. Genesis is the first book of the Law and also the first book of the entire Bible. The name Genesis literally means “In the Beginning”. It explains the actual events of one of the most debated subjects of our current day the origin of life. Genesis describes the Lord God, who is infinite and all-powerful, creating everything that exists, by the power of His spoken Word, out of nothing. He essentially creates material matter out of nonmaterial nothing.

Genesis chapter 1-25

Genesis chapter 26-50

The book of Exodus consists mainly of two genres, Narrative History, and Laws. It was written by Moses about 1450-1410 BC. The key personalities include Moses, Miriam, Pharaoh, Pharaoh’s daughter, Aaron, and Joshua. It was written to record the events of Israel’s deliverance from slavery in Egypt. It describes the events to the reader in chronological order and also lists the Laws that God has given to the Israelites, in order to guide them in their relationship with Him.

Exodus chapter 1-20

Exodus chapter 21-40

Throughout Leviticus, Israel remains encamped at Mount Sinai while God appears in the Tent of Meeting, dictating to Moses his specifications regarding the Jewish ceremonial laws. The laws are extremely detailed, outlining every aspect of how and when religious offerings are to be presented to God.

Leviticus chapter 1-20

Leviticus chapter 21-27

Numbers begin at Mount Sinai, where the Israelites have received their laws and covenant from God and God has taken up residence among them in the sanctuary. Numbers is the culmination of the story of Israel’s exodus from oppression in Egypt and their journey to take possession of the land God promised their fathers.

The book of Numbers was written to demonstrate that God’s covenant plan stays on track even when His people don’t. The instances of sinful complaining and rebellion and the resulting judgment are so pronounced and widespread that it seems like they will never make it (Num. 14:2-4, 26).

Numbers, Hebrew Bemidbar “In the Wilderness”, also called The Fourth Book Of Moses, the fourth book of the Bible. The book is basically the sacred history of the Israelites as they wandered in the wilderness following the departure from Sinai and before their occupation of Canaan, the Promised Land.

Numbers chapter 1-20

Numbers chapter 21-36

The genre of the book of Deuteronomy is not much different from that of Exodus. It is Narrative History and Law, although there is a Song from Moses just after he commissions Joshua. This song describes the History that the Israelites had experienced. Moses wrote Deuteronomy approximately 1407-1406 BC. The key personalities are Moses and Joshua.

Deuteronomy chapter 1-20

Deuteronomy chapter 21-34

After the death of Moses, God calls on Joshua to lead the Israelites across the Jordan River and take possession of the promised land. God guarantees victory in the military campaign and vows never to leave the Israelites so long as they obey his laws.

Joshua chapter 1-20

Joshua chapter 21-24

A Biblical judge was a ruler, military leader, and someone who presided over legal hearings. The judges were the successive individuals, each from a different tribe of Israel, chosen by God to rescue the people from their enemies and establish justice and the practice of the Torah amongst the Hebrews. The title of the book refers to the leaders of the Israelites during this time when they had no kings. There were 12 judges in all; Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar, Deborah, Gideon, Tola, Jair, Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon, and Samson.

Judges chapter 1-21

Ruth, a biblical character, a woman who after being widowed remains with her husband’s mother. The Book of Ruth relates that Ruth and Orpah, two women of Moab, had married two sons of Elimelech and Naomi, Judeans who had settled in Moab to escape a famine in Judah. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth’s husband died and in the line of David and Jesus.

Ruth chapter 1-4

1st Samuel is a story of Narrative History and includes a great deal of Drama. It is written by the last of the Judges for which the book is named, Samuel. It was written at about 930 B.C. Key personalities include Eli, Hannah, Samuel, Saul, Jonathan, and David. It was written to show Israel how they chose a king but in the process, they blatantly neglected and abandoned God.

1st Samuel chapter 1-20

1st Samuel chapter 21-31

The book of 2nd Samuel is a Narration of David as he becomes the King of Israel and the time during his reign, yet it also includes two psalms in hymns of praise in the final chapters. Its author is Samuel the prophet who wrote it at about 930 B.C. The key personalities are David, Joab, Bathsheba, Nathan, and Absalom. It was written to record the history of David’s reign and to demonstrate effective leadership under the submission of God. Approximately half of the book tells of King David’s success and the other half shows his failures.

2nd Samuel chapter 1-20

2nd Samuel chapter 21-24

The book of 1st Kings is Narrative History and Prophecy. The author is anonymous; however, some suggest the prophet, Jeremiah. It was written about 560-538 BC. The key personalities are David, Solomon, Rehoboam, Jeroboam, Elijah, Ahab, and Jezebel. The purpose of 1st Kings is to contrast those who obey and disobey God throughout the ruling kings of Israel and Judah. The book describes the rule of Solomon as the last king of Israel and then the split of the kingdom after his death. It includes a great prayer to the Lord in chapter 8. The writer of the books of Kings describes the events of the Northern and Southern Kingdoms after the division.

1st Kings chapter 1-20

1st Kings chapter 21-22

The book of 2nd Kings is Narrative History and Prophecy concerning the affairs of the divided kingdoms. The author is anonymous; however, some suggest the prophet, Jeremiah. It was written about 560-538 BC. Key personalities are many; they include Elijah, Elisha, the woman from Shunem, Naaman, Jezebel, Jehu, Joash, Hezekiah, Sennacherib, Isaiah, Manasseh, Josiah, Jehoiakim, Zedekiah, and Nebuchadnezzar. Its purpose was to demonstrate the value of those who obey God and the fate of those who refuse to obey and make Him the ultimate ruler. In this book, God performs amazing miracles through his prophets as He sends these messengers to herald His messages. The two kingdoms are far from the Lord and lost in the monotonous confusion of their sins. God’s prophets bring the only hope to this lost yet, chosen nation.

2nd Kings chapter 1-20

2nd Kings chapter 21-25

1st Chronicles the Chronicler is mainly interested in the tribes that formed the southern half of the ancient Kingdom of Israel Benjamin, Judah, and Levi. Benjamin and Judah are hugely important because they’re both ancestors of kings Saul, David, and Solomon respectively. Levi’s tribe is the one in charge of all the holy things. The book of 1st Chronicles is a book of Narrative History, and Genealogies. The author appears to be the prophet Ezra who wrote it circa 430 BC. It covers the events from 1000 to 960 BC. Key personalities are King David and Solomon.

1st Chronicles chapter 1-20

1st Chronicles chapter 21-29

The book of 2nd Chronicles is a Narrative History. The author appears to be the prophet Ezra who wrote it circa 430 BC. It covers the events from the beginning of King Solomon’s reign in 970 BC. up to the beginning of the Babylonian captivity in 586 BC. The key personalities are King Solomon, the queen of Sheba, Rehoboam, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Jehoram, Joash, Uzziah, Ahaz, Hezekiah, Manasseh, and Josiah. It was written to emphasize the blessings of the righteous kings and to expose the sins of the wicked kings. It parallels some parts of 1st and 2nd Kings. Like 1st Chronicles, it is written from the viewpoint of a priest who spoke from spiritual perspectives, including revivals. It too was written after the exile and focuses on correct worship to God.

2nd Chronicles chapter 1-20

2nd Chronicles chapter 21-36

Ezra is a book of Narrative History and Genealogies. It was written by Ezra at approximately 440 BC. and records events up to 450 BC. Key personalities include Cyrus, Ezra, Haggai, Zechariah, Darius I, Artaxerxes I, and Zerubbabel. Ezra’s purpose was to accurately record the events of the return from the Babylonian exile, after a seventy-year period and the events that surround the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem. God is faithful in fulfilling His promises and so the Jews return to Jerusalem from their exile in Babylon.

Ezra chapter 1-10

Nehemiah also spelled Nehemias, Jewish leader who supervised the rebuilding of Jerusalem in the mid-5th century bc after his release from captivity by the Persian king Artaxerxes I. He also instituted extensive moral and liturgical reforms in rededicating the Jews to Yahweh. The book of Nehemiah is Narrative History. Nehemiah authored it at about 430 BC. Key personalities include Nehemiah, Ezra, Sanballat, and Tobiah.

Nehemiah chapter 1-13

The genre of the book of Esther is Narrative History. Its author is anonymous however; some believe Mordecai, (Esther’s cousin and guardian), wrote it. It was written approximately 470 BC. in Persia. Esther became queen in 479 BC. The key personalities are Esther, Mordecai, King Ahasuerus (or Xerxes), and Haman. Its purpose is to demonstrate God’s love and sovereignty in all circumstances. It is a post-exile story about Jews who stayed behind after most returned to Jerusalem after the captivity. Babylon was conquered by Persia and Esther miraculously becomes the queen of the land and saves her people.

Esther 1-10

Job is a wealthy man living in a land called Uz with his large family and extensive flocks. He is “blameless” and “upright,” always careful to avoid doing evil (1:1). One day, Satan (“the Adversary”) appears before God in heaven. God boasts to Satan about Job’s goodness, but Satan argues that Job is only good because God has blessed him abundantly. Satan challenges God that, if given permission to punish the man, Job will turn and curse God. God allows Satan to torment Job to test this bold claim, but he forbids Satan to take Job’s life in the process.

In the course of one day, Job receives four messages, each bearing separate news that his livestock, servants, and ten children have all died due to marauding invaders or natural catastrophes. Job tears his clothes and shaves his head in mourning, but he still blesses God in his prayers. Satan appears in heaven again, and God grants him another chance to test Job. This time, Job is afflicted with horrible skin sores. His wife encourages him to curse God and to give up and die, but Job refuses, struggling to accept his circumstances.

Three of Job’s friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, come to visit him, sitting with Job in silence for seven days out of respect for his mourning. On the seventh day, Job speaks, beginning a conversation in which each of the four men shares his thoughts on Job’s afflictions in long, poetic statements.

Job curses the day he was born, comparing life and death to light and darkness. He wishes that his birth had been shrouded in darkness and longs to have never been born, feeling that light, or life, only intensifies his misery. Eliphaz responds that Job, who has comforted other people, now shows that he never really understood their pain. Eliphaz believes that Job’s agony must be due to some sin Job has committed, and he urges Job to seek God’s favor. Bildad and Zophar agree that Job must have committed evil to offend God’s justice and argue that he should strive to exhibit more blameless behavior. Bildad surmises that Job’s children brought their deaths upon themselves. Even worse, Zophar implies that whatever wrong Job has done probably deserves greater punishment than what he has received.

Job chapter 1-21

Job chapter 22-44

The Book of Psalms has a special significance for understanding the religious life of ancient Israel. The prophets and the sages provide some insight concerning what the Hebrews thought, but the psalms give the clearest indication of what the Hebrews felt. Here, we find a revelation of the hopes, the joys, the sorrows, the loyalties, the doubts, and the aspirations of the human heart.

Specially adapted for use in worship services, the psalms have been used in Christian churches, as well as in Jewish temples and synagogues. A psalm is a religious poem or song set to music. Some of the psalms in the Book of Psalms are hymns to be sung by a congregation, and “Songs of Ascent” to be sung by pilgrims approaching the Temple. Some are private prayers, and some are lyrical devices for recalling historical events in Israel’s history.

Psalms chapter 1-25

Psalms chapter 26-50

Psalms chapter 51-75

Psalms chapter 76-100

Psalms chapter 101-126

Psalms chapter 126-150

Proverbs is the chief volume in the biblical collection of wisdom literature, which also includes Ecclesiastes, Job, and portions of Psalms. A proverb is a short, pithy saying (A pithy phrase or statement is brief but full of substance and meaning) that usually draws a comparison between two forms of behavior in order to impart moral or religious wisdom to its receiver. It’s all about wisdom, knowledge, and understanding—and it all begins with fearing God.

Proverbs chapter 1-20

Proverbs chapter 21-31

The book of Ecclesiastes contains Proverbs, maxims, sayings, and is largely an autobiographical story. Solomon wrote it late in his life, approximately 935 BC. He had become aware of the mistakes that he made throughout his life and began to document them. The purpose of Ecclesiastes is to spare future generations the suffering and misery of seeking after foolish, meaningless, materialistic emptiness, and to offer wisdom by discovering truth in seeking after God. It appears that Solomon once again, wants to teach the reader wisdom, “I set my mind to seek and explore by wisdom concerning all that has been done under heaven. It is a grievous task which God has given to the sons of men to be afflicted with” (1:13).

Ecclesiastes chapter 1-12

The Song of Solomon is a series of lyrical poems organized as a lengthy dialogue between a young woman and her lover. She searches for her lover, comparing him to a wandering shepherd, and the chorus encourages her to follow the flocks to his tent. The lovers lie on a couch together.

Song of Solomon, also called Canticle of Canticles, or Song of Songs, an Old Testament book that belongs to the third section of the biblical canon, known as the Ketuvim, or “Writings”.

The story greatly emphasizes the sanctity of marriage and that it is designed, blessed and consecrated in the eyes of the Lord. The purpose of “Song of Songs”, as it is also called, is a picture of God’s love for His people. Although there is explicit sexual content, it is a book in which we can learn the depths of God’s authentic love for us and what should be in the sacredness of marriage.

Song of Songs chapter 1-8

Isaiah was a Hebrew prophet who was believed to have lived about 700 years before the birth of Jesus Christ. Born in Jerusalem, Israel, he was said to have found his calling as a prophet when he saw a vision in the year of King Uzziah’s death. Isaiah prophesized the coming of the Messiah Jesus Christ. Because of its scope, Isaiah contains one of the clearest expressions of the gospel in all the Old Testament. Even from the first chapter, it is clear that the people have turned away from God and failed in their responsibilities as His children (Isaiah 1:2–17). Yet God miraculously holds out hope to this unrepentant people, offering cleansing of sins and the blessing that comes with faith and obedience in Him (1:18–20). Salvation lies only in God—the only question is whether or not we will accept His offer.

In addition to its gospel message, the book of Isaiah clearly articulates the sins of God’s people—dealing with others unjustly which resulted in their offering hypocritical sacrifices to God. Do you see anything in your own life that might fall under Isaiah’s critique of injustice—treating family, colleagues, or even strangers with unkindness or even disdain? Isaiah’s message is also a call for believers to come back to purity in our love for God and for our neighbors (Luke 10:26–28).

Isaiah 1-22

Isaiah 23-44

Isaiah 45-66

With the single exception of the Book of Isaiah, which contains the works of more than one prophet, the Book of Jeremiah is the longest of the prophetic books of the Old Testament. Jeremiah contains a considerable amount of material of a biographical and historical nature in addition to the prophet’s own words. This material is especially valuable because it reveals the personality of the prophet more clearly than any of the other prophetic books reveal their writers’ personalities. Furthermore, the text provides information concerning the more important events in Jeremiah’s career.

Jeremiah’s life and teachings had a profound effect on the future development of both Judaism and Christianity. In the New Testament, many passages indicate that both Jesus and Paul not only accepted certain ideas from Jeremiah but gave them a central place in their own interpretations of the meaning of religion. For this reason, along with others, Jeremiah is often regarded as the greatest of the Hebrew prophets.

Jeremiah chapter 1-26

Book of Lamentations known to be written by prophet Jeremiah and is placed immediately after the Book of Jeremiah in OT. It is composed of five chapters or poems lamenting on the siege and destruction and fall of Jerusalem and the captivity of the nation at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar’s army.

Lamentations chapter 1-5

Ezekiel this book is about the destruction and exile of Judah and the promise of its eventual restoration by God. Ezekiel’s in Babylon, having been exiled there, after the first siege of Judah by the Babylonians. The Book of Ezekiel has the most logical arrangement of any of the prophetic books. It contains three sections, each of which addresses a different subject matter. Chapters 1–24 concern the fall of Jerusalem. Chapters 25–39 contain a series of oracles addressed to foreign nations, concluding with a section in which the future of Israel is contrasted with that of the foreign nations. The third section, Chapters 40–48, presents a plan for rebuilding the Temple and reorganizing the restored state of Israel.

Ezekiel chapter 1-24

Ezekiel chapter 25-48

Daniel was a righteous man of princely lineage and lived about 620–538 BC. He was carried off to Babylon in 605 BC. by Nebuchadnezzar, the Assyrian. Nebuchadnezzar II was the greatest king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He is known for rebuilding much of Babylon and restoring it to its former glory.

Ancient Mesopotamia – Nebuchadnezzar was born around 634 BC in the city of Babylon. His father was Nabopolassar, the king of Babylon. Growing up, Nebuchadnezzar was raised as the crown prince of the nation. He learned about the Babylonian gods, the laws of Babylon, and how to fight and lead an army. When Nebuchadnezzar was born, Babylon was ruled by the Assyrian Empire. However, while still a boy his father led a revolt against the Assyrians. He allied with the Medes and defeated the Assyrians sacking the city of Nineveh in 612 BC.

Belteshazzar is the Babylonian name that was given to Daniel after he was taken into exile in 617 BC. The name means “Protect the Life of the King.” His name was changed to fit in with culture and customs so that he and his two companions can serve king Nebuchadnezzar. But Daniel was still living when Assyria was overthrown by the Medes and Persians. Daniel continues to confessing the sins of his people to God. He then asks God again for mercy, pleading with him to turn his wrath away from Jerusalem. He asks God to turn his face towards now-desolated Jerusalem. He further asks for God’s forgiveness toward a nation and a city that bear his name.

Daniel 1-12

Hosea is a prophet whom God uses to portray a message of repentance to God’s people. Through Hosea’s marriage to Gomer, God, shows his great love for his people, comparing himself to a husband whose wife has committed adultery.

Hosea 1-14

Joel a prophet is mentioned by name only once in the Hebrew Bible, in the introduction to that book, as the son of Pethuel (Joel 1:1). The name Joel combines the covenant name of God, YHWH or Yahweh, and El (God), and has been translated as “one to whom YHWH is God,” that is, a worshiper of YHWH.

Joel’s pressing mission is to focus on convincing the people to return to the Lord before it is too late. He is confident that a return to the Lord is the only way not to perish, and he knows that the people want to survive. He announces that there is still time to return to the Lord.

Joel chapter 1-4

Amos was a shepherd who lived in the region of Tekoa, not many miles from the city of Jerusalem. He made his living by raising sheep and taking care of sycamore trees. When his produce was ready for the market, he went to the towns and villages of Israel. Amos wrote at a time of relative peace and prosperity but also of neglect of God’s laws. He spoke against an increased disparity between the very wealthy and the very poor. His major themes of justice, God’s omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy. Amos, (flourished 8th-century bc), the first Hebrew prophet to have a biblical book named for him. He accurately foretold the destruction of the northern kingdom of Israel (although he did not specify Assyria as the cause) and, as a prophet of doom, anticipated later Old Testament prophets.

Amos 1-9

The book of Obadiah is based on a prophetic vision concerning the fall of Edom, a mountain-dwelling nation whose founding father was Esau. Obadiah describes an encounter with God, who addresses Edom’s arrogance and charges them for their violent actions against their brother nation, the House of Jacob (Israel).

Obadiah chapter 1

Jonah is the central character in the Book of Jonah, in which God commands him to go to the city of Nineveh to prophesy against it “for their great wickedness is come up before me,” but Jonah instead attempts to flee from “the presence of the Lord” by going to Jaffa and sailing to Tarshish.

Jonah chapter 1-4

The prophet Micah identified himself by his hometown, called Moresheth Gath, which sat near the border of Philistia and Judah about twenty-five miles southwest of Jerusalem. Dwelling in a largely agricultural part of the country, Micah lived outside the governmental centers of power in his nation, leading to his strong concern for the lowly and less fortunate of society—the lame, the outcasts, and the afflicted (Micah 4:6). Therefore, Micah directed much of his prophecy toward the powerful leaders of Samaria and Jerusalem, the capital cities of Israel and Judah.

As a contemporary of Isaiah and Hosea, Micah prophesied during the momentous years surrounding the tragic fall of Israel to the Assyrian Empire (722 BC), an event he also predicted (Micah 1:6). Micah stated in his introduction to the book that he prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah in Judah, failing to mention the simultaneous string of dishonorable kings that closed out the northern kingdom of Israel.

The book of Micah provides one of the most significant prophecies of Jesus Christ’s birth in all the Old Testament, pointing some seven hundred years before Christ’s birth to His birthplace of Bethlehem and to His eternal nature (Micah 5:2). Much of Micah’s book revolves around two significant predictions: one of judgment on Israel and Judah (Micah 1:1–3:12), the other of the restoration of God’s people in the millennial kingdom (4:1–5:15). Judgment and restoration inspire fear and hope, two ideas wrapped up in the final sequence of Micah’s prophecy, a courtroom scene in which God’s people stand trial before their Creator for turning away from Him and from others (6:1–7:20). In this sequence, God reminds the people of His good works on their behalf, how He cared for them while they cared only for themselves. But rather than leave God’s people with the fear and sting of judgment, the book of Micah concludes with the prophet’s call on the Lord as his only source of salvation and mercy (7:7), pointing the people toward an everlasting hope in their everlasting God.

Micah chapter 1-7

From its opening, Nahum shows God to be slow to anger, but that God will by no means ignore the guilty; God will bring his vengeance and wrath to pass. God is presented as a God who will punish evil but will protect those who trust in Him.

Nahum chapter 1-3

The major theme of Habakkuk is trying to grow from a faith of perplexity and doubt to the height of absolute trust in God. Habakkuk addresses his concerns over the fact that God will use the Babylonian empire to execute judgment on Judah for their sins. Habakkuk openly questions the wisdom of God. The only work attributed to Habakkuk is the short book of the Bible that bears his name. The book of Habakkuk consists of five oracles about the Chaldeans (Babylonians) and a song of praise to God. The style of the book has been praised by many scholars, suggesting that its author was a man of great literary talent.

HabakkuK 1-3

The Book of Zephaniah, the ninth book of the Twelve (Minor) Prophets. The dominant theme of the book is the “day of the Lord,” which the prophet sees approaching as a consequence of the sins of Judah. A remnant will be saved the “humble and lowly” through purification by judgment.

In Zephaniah 1:1, the author introduces himself as “Zephaniah son of Cushi, son of Gedaliah, son of Amariah, son of Hezekiah.” Among the prophets, this is a unique introduction with its long list of fathers back to Zephaniah’s great-great-grandfather, Hezekiah. So why stop with Hezekiah? Most likely, the prophet wanted to highlight his royal lineage as a descendant of one of Judah’s good kings.

Those living in Judah had turned the worship of God into a fiasco. Not only had they built their own places of worship to revere other gods (called “high places” in the Old Testament), but they had begun to desecrate the temple, which at that time was the dwelling place of God (Zephaniah 1:9).

Zephaniah chapter 1-3

The Book of Haggai was written in 520 BC, some 18 years after Cyrus had conquered Babylon and issued a decree in 538 BC, allowing the captive Jews to return to Judea. Cyrus saw the restoration of the temple as necessary for the restoration of the religious practices, and a sense of peoplehood, after a long exile.

The Jews who emigrated from Babylon to their original homeland of Judah faced intense opposition, both external and internal. Ezra 4:1–5 records the external resistance to the project of rebuilding the temple. The enemies of Judah first attempted to infiltrate the ranks of the builders, and when that didn’t work, they resorted to scare tactics. Haggai, on the other hand, focused on the internal opposition they faced, namely from their own sin. The Jews had thoughtlessly placed their own interests before the Lord’s interests, looking after their own safety and security without giving consideration to the status of the Lord’s house.

Haggai’s encouragement to rebuild the temple in the face of the Jews’ neglect brings to mind the apostle Paul’s exhortation to Christians to build our lives on the foundation of Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 3:10–17). Are you building a life that reflects your status as a temple of the Holy Spirit, leaving a legacy that will stand the test of time? Find encouragement for that construction project in the four passionate sermons from this Old Testament prophet.

Haggai 1-2

Among Zechariah’s visions was one that described four apocalyptic horsemen who presaged God’s revival of Jerusalem after its desolation during the Babylonian Exile. Other visions announced the rebuilding of the Temple and the world’s recognition of Yahweh, Israel’s God.

The book of Zechariah contains the clearest and the largest number of messianic (about the Messiah) passages among the Minor Prophets. In that respect, it’s possible to think of the book of Zechariah as a kind of miniature book of Isaiah. Zechariah pictures Christ in both His first coming (Zechariah 9:9) and His second coming (9:10–10:12). Jesus will come, according to Zechariah, as Savior, Judge, and ultimately, as the righteous King ruling His people from Jerusalem (14:8–9).

Zechariah chapter 1-14

Malachi is the last book of the Old Testament and is a book of Prophetic Oracle. It is a post-exilic book, meaning it was written after the return from captivity in Babylon. The prophet Malachi wrote it approximately 430 BC. Key personalities include Malachi and the priests. The purpose of this book is that Malachi wrote to ensure that the hearts of the Jews was right and that they were keeping God first in their lives.

Malachi chapter 1-4

 

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